Monday, June 05, 2006

Articles I y II ... (listenign to Jesus Is Just Alright)

FACT… In 1998, the Autry Museum of Western Heritage presented Culture y Cultura: How the U.S.-Mexican War Shaped the West … the only major U.S. exhibition of its kind, it examined the historical, social and cultural forces of the war, the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the legacy that continues to affect Mexican American communities and people of the American West even today. Curated by Theresa R. Gonzalez, then assistant curator at the Autry Museum, the exhibit explored the forces that created and shaped a unique cultural identity from both sides of what has become the present border …

AND MORE FACTS … de Culture y Cultura: How the U.S.-Mexican War Shaped the West ET AL …

The Mexican-American War grew out of a US expansionist ideology known as Manifest Destiny. Interest in the lands to the west of the United States had been growing. Some of the lands in this region had become familiar to American mountain men as well as tradesmen who frequented the Santa Fe Trail. A few hundred Americans were already in California, coming by way of the California trail, and American ships had been exchanging various goods for hides and tallow all along the coast of California. All of this area was, before the Mexican-American war, the sovereign territory of the independent Mexican republic for some 30 years, and before that, part of the Spanish imperial claim in North America.

… When the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in 1848, Mexico lost the northern frontier, which amounted to half of its territory. Mexican residents in the region faced the challenges of preserving their communities within a dramatically different culture.
Communities in Texas, California, New Mexico and Arizona/Sonora developed in much the same ways as Spanish towns, but the distance from Spain and its government inevitably affected them, too. The communities continued to grow after Mexico won its independence from Spain in 1821.

Between 1820 and the mid-1840s, American citizens had begun entering Mexico in significant numbers, creating a natural exchange of commerce and culture. Many traded with Mexicans and married and assimilated into Mexican culture.

Regional tensions soon led to national conflict, which resulted in military hostilities. Declaring war in 1846, the United States began a three-pronged approach against Mexico -- south from Texas into northern Mexico, west from Kansas through New Mexico and into California and from Veracruz into Mexico City. After Americans occupied Mexico City, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war.

"Mexican American communities faced immense challenges with the establishment of a new government, new laws, a different language and economic changes," Gonzalez noted. "Over the past 150 years, social, economic and political power shifts have continued to evolve, and the culture of Mexican American communities has become an intrinsic part of the nation's character. These are some of the central issues we hope to address in Culture y Cultura."

Ummmmm … pues …. while the United States appointed Nicholas Trist and Mexico appointed Don Luis Gonzaga Cuevas and Jose Bernardo Couto and Don Miguel Atristain to negotiate a treaty between both sides … we see more characters emerge from Articles I y II from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo …

ARTICLE I
There shall be firm and universal peace between the United States of America and the Mexican Republic, and between their respective countries, territories, cities, towns, and people, without exception of places or persons.


Pues ondale … “without exception of places or person” … it appears writers of this document knew too well que bad vibes and shattt would continue and extist between LOS VECINOS who just threw blows … so where do the MINUTEMAN and an attempted ENGLISH ONLY LAW ET AL all stand in all this “firm and universal peace” and “without exception of places or person” cochinada …

ARTICLE II
Immediately upon the signature of this treaty, a convention shall be entered into between a commissioner or commissioners appointed by the General-in-chief of the forces of the United States, and such as may be appointed by the Mexican Government, to the end that a provisional suspension of hostilities shall take place, and that, in the places occupied by the said forces, constitutional order may be reestablished, as regards the political, administrative, and judicial branches, so far as this shall be permitted by the circumstances of military occupation.

A convention was held on July 6, 1849 in San Diego … booze … broads … plumas y papel … and a temporary Border Commission was in fact created to carry out the 1848 Treaty … Polk appointed Ambrose Sevier, a young and newly elected Senator from Arkansas … but the vato died … so John B. Weller, an Ohio Congressman who then became Califas Congressman, stepped in … and from Mexico … Pedro Conde Garcia was appointed … juntos … Homies Unidos, Weller y Garcia drew the pinche migra line from San Diego to the Colorado River … and they obviously made campo for all SUV freaks at “THE RIVER” …

Weller eventually resigned because the vato was just pinche corrupt … John C. Fremont then steppend in … entonces the vato resigned after being elected a Califas lawmaker … entonces … este … John Russell Bartlett stepped in … this was 1850 … and when you consider the characters in this treatise play … it was skewed from the beginning …

The Border Commission then became the pinche International Boundry and Water Commission from Texas and still exist hoy … marking up the fucking mundo and shitttt …

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